joshbyard:

Researchers Using Big Data to Forecast Genocide

Australian researchers say they have developed a mathematical model to predict genocide. A Swiss sociologist has sifted through a century of news articles to predict when war will break out — both between and within countries. A Duke University lab builds software that it says can be used to forecast insurgencies. A team assembled by the Holocaust Museum is mining hate speech on Twitter as a way to anticipate outbreaks of political violence: It will be rolled out next year for the elections in Nigeria, which have frequently been marred by violence.
What makes these efforts so striking is that they rely on computing techniques — and sometimes huge amounts of computing power — to mash up all kinds of data, ranging from a country’s defense budget and infant mortality rate to the kinds of words used in news articles and Twitter posts.
None of this has yet produced a perfect crystal ball to foretell mass violence — and for good reason. “Events are rare, data we have is really noisy,” said Jay Ulfelder, a political scientist who is developing a web-based early warning system to forecast mass atrocities. “That makes it a particularly hard forecasting task.”
But social scientists are getting better at anticipating where trouble might start — or as Mr. Ulfelder put it, “assessing risks.” That explains why the United States intelligence community has been exploring the field for years. The government’s Political Instability Task Force, which Mr. Ulfelder helped to run for over a decade, tries to predict which countries are likely to witness civil unrest in the near term. Its data is not public, nor is information on how the government uses its predictions.

(via Spreadsheets and Global Mayhem - NYTimes.com ht StoweBoyd)

joshbyard:

Researchers Using Big Data to Forecast Genocide

Australian researchers say they have developed a mathematical model to predict genocide. A Swiss sociologist has sifted through a century of news articles to predict when war will break out — both between and within countries. A Duke University lab builds software that it says can be used to forecast insurgencies. A team assembled by the Holocaust Museum is mining hate speech on Twitter as a way to anticipate outbreaks of political violence: It will be rolled out next year for the elections in Nigeria, which have frequently been marred by violence.

What makes these efforts so striking is that they rely on computing techniques — and sometimes huge amounts of computing power — to mash up all kinds of data, ranging from a country’s defense budget and infant mortality rate to the kinds of words used in news articles and Twitter posts.

None of this has yet produced a perfect crystal ball to foretell mass violence — and for good reason. “Events are rare, data we have is really noisy,” said Jay Ulfelder, a political scientist who is developing a web-based early warning system to forecast mass atrocities. “That makes it a particularly hard forecasting task.”

But social scientists are getting better at anticipating where trouble might start — or as Mr. Ulfelder put it, “assessing risks.” That explains why the United States intelligence community has been exploring the field for years. The government’s Political Instability Task Force, which Mr. Ulfelder helped to run for over a decade, tries to predict which countries are likely to witness civil unrest in the near term. Its data is not public, nor is information on how the government uses its predictions.

(via Spreadsheets and Global Mayhem - NYTimes.com ht StoweBoyd)

36 notes

Worked on the same assignment for about 30 hours over the past week and it is still incomplete. Such is life in Computer Science.  =.=

0 notes

txchnologist:

Software Accurately Predicts Faces As Babies Age Over Lifetime

Computer scientists can now predict how a person’s face ages from a baby to an older adult.

University of Washington researchers have developed software that automatically morphs a face through a lifetime of growing and changing no matter the lighting, expression or pose of the subject in the starting picture.

“Aging photos of very young children from a single photo is considered the most difficult of all scenarios, so we wanted to focus specifically on this very challenging case,” said study coauthor Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering, in a university statement. “We took photos of children in completely unrestrained conditions and found that our method works remarkably well.”

See a comparison of their morphing software and the real person at different ages below.

Read More

143 notes

Headquarters of Benito Mussolini and the Italian Fascist Party.

Headquarters of Benito Mussolini and the Italian Fascist Party.

3 notes

prostheticknowledge:

Donut Math

Program in C code, shaped like a donut, renders a 3D donut shape in ASCII, originally put together in 2006 by Andy Sloane:

At its core, it’s a framebuffer and a Z-buffer into which I render pixels. Since it’s just rendering relatively low-resolution ASCII art, I massively cheat. All it does is plot pixels along the surface of the torus at fixed-angle increments, and does it densely enough that the final result looks solid. The “pixels” it plots are ASCII characters corresponding to the illumination value of the surface at each point: .,-~:;=!*#$@ from dimmest to brightest. No raytracing required.

More technical discussion can be found here
The code itself is posted here

(via luccica)

645 notes

tonyfromstatefarm:

Me participating in a group project.

tonyfromstatefarm:

Me participating in a group project.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via tastefullyoffensive)

561,815 notes

(Source: studygeek, via visualizingmath)

894 notes

My dear friends on Tumblr, please listen to some electronic music I made! :3

3 notes

zerostatereflex:

Water Experiment No. 33 Automata

What a beautiful work of craftsmanship.

(via visualizingmath)

151,324 notes

The area around my house in Santa Cruz, CA

2 notes

Chrysocolla in malachite

Chrysocolla in malachite

8 notes

scientificvisuals:

Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm.

Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.

(via scientificvisuals)

1,759 notes

0 notes

miymintimatmazel:

Stairway to Heaven.
Left After Assad Bombing in Aleppo

miymintimatmazel:

Stairway to Heaven.


Left After Assad Bombing in Aleppo

(via 2-sp00ky-2)

14,146 notes

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

37,097 notes