tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

3,032 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

"Human, why you do this for?" [x]

5,696 notes

me

(Source: spleenwheel, via art-sci)

92,806 notes

Anonymous asked: Have you ever had an imaginary friend? :D

owlturdcomix:

2,474 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

“Bye honey, I’m off to work.” [x]

18,514 notes

thecubbycave:

Colours of Rainbow Key Chart, from ‘Rainbow’ card game, c. 1920 http://ift.tt/NkA0wP

thecubbycave:

Colours of Rainbow Key Chart, from ‘Rainbow’ card game, c. 1920 http://ift.tt/NkA0wP

(via ilovecharts)

1,120 notes

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal
That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.
This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.
Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 
(GIF via NC State University)

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal

That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.

This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.

Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 

(GIF via NC State University)

1,749 notes

queen-under-mountain:

Perks of going to college in the woods.

queen-under-mountain:

Perks of going to college in the woods.

(via ucsc)

77 notes

I cannot study and listen to music at the same time anymore. My brain tries to analyze every little chord and melody at the expense of my concentration. Thank god for websites that generate white noise.

2 notes

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via togifs)

9,789 notes

(Source: citizendev, via dontgetattached)

76,860 notes

littleanimalgifs:

I think there’s something on my head…

littleanimalgifs:

I think there’s something on my head…

(Source: xoxsammyoxo, via togifs)

2,416 notes

joshbyard:

Researchers Using Big Data to Forecast Genocide

Australian researchers say they have developed a mathematical model to predict genocide. A Swiss sociologist has sifted through a century of news articles to predict when war will break out — both between and within countries. A Duke University lab builds software that it says can be used to forecast insurgencies. A team assembled by the Holocaust Museum is mining hate speech on Twitter as a way to anticipate outbreaks of political violence: It will be rolled out next year for the elections in Nigeria, which have frequently been marred by violence.
What makes these efforts so striking is that they rely on computing techniques — and sometimes huge amounts of computing power — to mash up all kinds of data, ranging from a country’s defense budget and infant mortality rate to the kinds of words used in news articles and Twitter posts.
None of this has yet produced a perfect crystal ball to foretell mass violence — and for good reason. “Events are rare, data we have is really noisy,” said Jay Ulfelder, a political scientist who is developing a web-based early warning system to forecast mass atrocities. “That makes it a particularly hard forecasting task.”
But social scientists are getting better at anticipating where trouble might start — or as Mr. Ulfelder put it, “assessing risks.” That explains why the United States intelligence community has been exploring the field for years. The government’s Political Instability Task Force, which Mr. Ulfelder helped to run for over a decade, tries to predict which countries are likely to witness civil unrest in the near term. Its data is not public, nor is information on how the government uses its predictions.

(via Spreadsheets and Global Mayhem - NYTimes.com ht StoweBoyd)

joshbyard:

Researchers Using Big Data to Forecast Genocide

Australian researchers say they have developed a mathematical model to predict genocide. A Swiss sociologist has sifted through a century of news articles to predict when war will break out — both between and within countries. A Duke University lab builds software that it says can be used to forecast insurgencies. A team assembled by the Holocaust Museum is mining hate speech on Twitter as a way to anticipate outbreaks of political violence: It will be rolled out next year for the elections in Nigeria, which have frequently been marred by violence.

What makes these efforts so striking is that they rely on computing techniques — and sometimes huge amounts of computing power — to mash up all kinds of data, ranging from a country’s defense budget and infant mortality rate to the kinds of words used in news articles and Twitter posts.

None of this has yet produced a perfect crystal ball to foretell mass violence — and for good reason. “Events are rare, data we have is really noisy,” said Jay Ulfelder, a political scientist who is developing a web-based early warning system to forecast mass atrocities. “That makes it a particularly hard forecasting task.”

But social scientists are getting better at anticipating where trouble might start — or as Mr. Ulfelder put it, “assessing risks.” That explains why the United States intelligence community has been exploring the field for years. The government’s Political Instability Task Force, which Mr. Ulfelder helped to run for over a decade, tries to predict which countries are likely to witness civil unrest in the near term. Its data is not public, nor is information on how the government uses its predictions.

(via Spreadsheets and Global Mayhem - NYTimes.com ht StoweBoyd)

39 notes

Worked on the same assignment for about 30 hours over the past week and it is still incomplete. Such is life in Computer Science.  =.=

0 notes